The recording attached to this post is a meditation. It consists of preparation for meditation, the reading of a poem/prayer. and a period of reflection.

I wrote the poem “Noon Wave” in November of 2015 — before the turmoil of the 2016 Presidential campaign and election, and certainly well before we gave any thought at all to a virus family called “corona”!

It seems like a good time to bring this poem back out; most of us could use all the help calming and grounding ourselves that we can find.

 When I named the poem, I guess I was drawing on an old Catholic practice of saying a prayer called “The Angelus” every day at noon. Originally, the prayer was recited three times a day: at 6:00 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m., but in the memories of my childhood, it was said at noon — and even when I was a child, the custom was fading.

There are probably some people who still hold with this practice today, but to my mind, the idea of local church bells tolling Noon, calling the faithful to stop whatever activity they were engaged in and take a few minutes to pray, was from an older time. As an undergraduate Art major (and therefore a student of Art History), I was familiar with Millet’s famous painting that depicted a farming couple standing in their field at sunset, heads bowed as they prayed “The Angelus” together, so that’s the image I carry in my head.

Back in 2015 when I first shared this poem, it was my hope that it could be used as a way to stop each day at noon and take time to re-establish our connections to each other, to our Earth, and to our Source.

Today, I invite you to adopt that practice, if you like — but my real hope is that, whenever you use this meditation, it will bring you some measure of calm, groundedness, peace, and hope.